Posted by: Melissa Kvidahl | April 18, 2014

Stay Connected with the Rutgers Day Mobile App

App 1This year, we’re excited to launch our new Rutgers Day mobile app. It’s free and available for iOS and Android devices.

It’s perfect to use on Rutgers Day to find parking, exhibits, performances, and food, since all the maps are interactive. That means you can see the location of every program we have this year relative to other programs or where you’re standing on campus.

You can click on the program’s flag to see more details, such as a description and sponsor, and even get directions to parking lots nearby if you’re en route to the event.

It’s also really useful as a planning tool leading up to Rutgers Day. Browse programs by location or by interest area (kids, sports, science, arts, and more), and save programs you don’t want to miss to your personal itinerary. We’ll see you there!

 

Posted by: robertforman2014 | April 17, 2014

Do You Have What it Takes to Perform Brain Surgery?

ImageYou’ve certainly heard people use the expression, “It’s not brain surgery!” to describe a job that isn’t especially hard. Well, on Rutgers Day, April 26, you will have the chance to experience something that is brain surgery.

Neurosurgery experts from Rutgers’ two medical schools will demonstrate what it’s like to be a brain surgeon.

On the College Avenue Campus, you will find an exhibit called Brain Surgery for/on Dummies. Real neurosurgeons from Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School will be there to show you how both brain and spine surgery are done – on the same highly sophisticated computer simulators that they use to train young neurosurgeons. Then they will give you the opportunity to perform “surgery” on model skulls, and to show off your skills by trying to drill a hole in a “brain” made of Jello. “Maybe we will recruit you on the spot!” says the school’s director of cerebrovascular and endovascular neurosurgery, Gaurav Gupta. Or maybe you’ll make such a mess that the good doctor and his associates will steer you gently but firmly toward a profession that isn’t brain surgery.

On the Busch Campus, a team from the Neurological Institute of New Jersey at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School will give prizes to people who can perform under pressure while playing the nerve-wracking games “Operation” and “Brain Surgery” – while an exhibit nearby will explain some of the brain’s mysteries. Barry Levin, professor and interim chair of the school’s Department of Neurology and Neurosciences, says these brain presentations give people an important look “behind the curtain” at some complicated stuff. “Patients are often scared when faced with a neurological disease or disorder because there can be stigmas related to these diagnoses,” says Levin. “Getting out into the community to give patients more insight into what we do is invaluable.”

It’s invaluable, and it also will be lots of fun. So, see you there!

Posted by: Andrea Alexander | April 13, 2014

New Jersey Folk Festival: Building Students’ Skills for 40 Years

The New Jersey Folk Festival in 1988.

The New Jersey Folk Festival in 1988.

Making a resume stand out in tough times can be difficult. But for decades, some Rutgers students found an unexpected activity helped get a foot in the door: Running the New Jersey Folk Festival.

“I had good grades, a lot of activities and internships. But in the middle of all of that, the one thing that jumped off my resume was the festival,’’ said Suzanne Confer, who graduated from Rutgers in 1993 in the midst of another economic downturn.

During interviews Confer could talk about how she managed public relations for an event that drew more than 10,000 people each year.

The New Jersey Folk Festival will mark its 40th anniversary celebrating the state’s diverse – and some lesser known – cultures during Rutgers Day.  Over the years the festival has honored 30 different ethnicities, welcomed a Bulgarian Ambassador and showcased cultures that were later recognized as part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

But an equally important legacy of the folk festival – considered the largest student run event of its kind in the United States – is how it changed the lives of the people behind it.

“I can see a straight line from what I did then to where I am now,’’ said Jaclyn Stewart Wood, a 2001 Rutgers graduate and director of the Jersey Shore Folklife Center at the Tuckerton Seaport. More

Posted by: Amber E. Hopkins-Jenkins | April 8, 2014

Welcome to the Countdown to Rutgers Day 2014 Blog

Rutgers Marching BandMark your calendar for Rutgers Day on Saturday, April 26.

The university’s annual welcome and show-and-tell for New Jersey residents of all ages promises something for everyone with nearly 500 programs. 

Learn all about big time academics, big time athletics and Rutgers’ transition into the Big Ten Conference on Voorhees Mall. Visitors can also catch the Scarlet and White spring football game in High Point Solutions Stadium at the end of the day. 

Take a closer look at the human brain and its complexities on the Busch Campus. Play games to learn about brain processing and learning, and perform surgery on model skulls with a little guidance from the region’s top neurosurgeons. 

Students from the East Asian, Spanish, African, Middle East and French special-interest houses in the Global Village Learning Community on the Douglass Campus will share their various language and cultural experiences. And don’t miss the New Jersey Folk Festival, which celebrates its 40th anniversary this year.

Be certain to return to this blog frequently. We will provide the latest news and information in the weeks leading up to the big day. Check out the Meet the Bloggers section to learn more about our team. 

We also encourage you to download the new Rutgers Day mobile app, visit us on Facebook and Twitter, read our news release and browse the Rutgers Day website for more specific information about activities on each campus. 

See you soon!

Posted by: Andrea Alexander | April 27, 2013

A Record Crowd at Rutgers Day

Crowd

A record crowd of 83,000 attended the fifth annual Rutgers Day

A record crowd of 83,000 came out to the fifth annual Rutgers Day to savor the finest the state university has to offer.

Spectators lined College Avenue for the first Rutgers Day Parade to watch members of the Rutgers Marching Band, the ROTC Color Guard, dance team and cheerleaders, as well as other student organizations, make their way from Brower Commons to Voorhees Mall.

Those who attended, like 1998 alumna Stephanie Cooper, said this year’s addition of the parade made Rutgers Day even more enjoyable.

“This was a fabulous day – a great day to showcase Rutgers pride,” said Linda Bassett, who directs Rutgers Day.

Amid sunny skies and warm temperatures, visitors took part in more than 500 programs and activities sponsored by schools, departments, institutes, centers and student organizations, on Rutgers campuses in New Brunswick and Piscataway.

At the New Jersey Folk Festival – one of the many events that make up Rutgers Day – the event was dedicated to celebrating the culture and traditions of the people of Garifuna, a Central American community that has survived wars, exile and deprivation and is still flourishing.

Camillo Gonsalves, permanent representative to the United Nations for St. Vincent and the Grenadines, shared the story of the Garifuna people.

Camillo Gonsalves, permanent representative to the United Nations for St. Vincent and the Grenadines, shared the story of the Garifuna people.

Richard L. Edwards, Rutgers executive vice president for academic affairs, extended greetings from the university to Camillo Gonsalves, permanent representative to the United Nations for St. Vincent and the Grenadines. The ambassador attended the festival on behalf of the Garifuna and shared their story of survival.

“I believe this is due in great part to their absolute refusal to surrender against incredible odds,” Gonsalves said.

St. Vincent is the ancestral homeland of the Garifuna people, who today are found largely in Belize, Nicaragua, Honduras and Guatemala. A large Garifuna diaspora also exists in New York and New Jersey, the ambassador said.

This Rutgers Day was also dedicated to a story of survival closer to home – families still recovering from Hurricane Sandy.

The Rutgers Oral History Archives staff interviewed Sandy survivors.  A map of New Jersey at their table featured nearly 100 brightly colored pins – stretching from Millville to Midland Park – representing everyone who stopped by today.

Middle Schoolers from Sandy-affected towns took to the field in the final minutes of the Scarlet-White game.

Middle Schoolers from Sandy-affected towns took to the field in the final minutes of the Scarlet-White game.

Visitors to the booth were able to get online and read stories recorded by their hometown neighbors, said Shaun Illingworth, who directs the archives. “Rutgers Day is a great opportunity to connect with the people we serve,” he said.

The day ended with more than 21,000 fans at High Point Solutions Stadium for the Scarlet-White spring football game, which raised money for Sandy victims. Rutgers players’ jerseys featured the names of towns across New Jersey affected by the hurricane.

In the game’s final five minutes middle school students from Sandy-affected communities ran onto the field and played flag football in front of the cheering crowd.

Posted by: stetler735 | April 27, 2013

Gonna Fly Now? Try the Flight Simulator First

The remote control flight simulator at Busch Campus today is like training wheels for the X8 Flying Wing, a large model plane that can fly autonomously.

J'Onai Dixon Jr. prepares for takeoff.

J’Onai Dixon Jr. prepares for takeoff.

The X8 was created by student members of  the Rutgers Autonomous Aircraft Team , who designed and programmed it to fly by itself for as long as 25 minutes.

“We start new members out on the flight simulator so they learn how to fly a plane instead of starting right away on the real plane and smashing it up,” says Daniel Collison, treasurer of the team and a major in Mechanical Aerospace Engineering.

The flight simulator allows aspiring pilots to experience flight by  guiding an onscreen plane from runway to wild blue yonder.

“It feels like you’re really flying,” said J’Onai Dixon of Piscataway, who tried out the simulator, along with his son J’Onai Jr.

For Dixon, the simulator was a way to gauge whether to buy his son a toy remote control plane. After trying out the simulator, he was leaning toward it, but maybe not until J’Onai Jr. is a bit older.

The younger Dixon gave a thumbs up to the simulator.

“It was so much fun,” he raved.

Although the X8 was grounded for the day, members of RU Autonomous, as they call themselves, were happy to show it off.

Later this year, it will take off at the  AUVSI UAS student competition in Maryland, where Rutgers placed 11th last year.

The X8 Flying Wing

The X8 Flying Wing

Posted by: rlally2013 | April 27, 2013

A Day at the Museum

First year student Carolina Rostek has her facepainted at the Zimmerli

First year student Carolina Rostek has her facepainted at the Zimmerli

It is not your typical day at the museum.  But like the rest of the Rutgers University campus, the Zimmerli is overflowing with children, teens, college students and families being treated to everything from storytelling and scavenger hunts to dance performances and gallery tours.

This afternoon storyteller Ellen Musikant had a group of four and five year olds enthralled in her story about the three bears as they sat on the floor listening to every word. Meanwhile, across the hall, a group of first year Rutgers students were having flowery designs and Rutgers Rs painted on arms and faces.“This has been a lot of fun,” said Patricia Zale who attended Rutgers Day with two of her friends and had her face painted like a lion.  “We didn’t know what to expect but it’s been a good day.”

Stacy Smith, manager for communications at the Zimmerli, said the nice weather and the festivities throughout the campus have attracted many new families with children who she doesn’t think have ever visited the Zimmerli.  Besides coming for the special attractions offered on Rutgers Day, Smith said that many families are taking the museum tours and reading books on individual exhibitions.

“It’s really nice to see so many new visitors,” she said. “What we are hoping is that they have such a great time that they decide to come back.”

Posted by: Fredda Sacharow | April 27, 2013

Saluting the Music of a Resilient People

Ambassador Camillo Gonsalves brings greetings from St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

Ambassador Camillo Gonsalves brings greetings from St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

The New Jersey Folk Festival is paying tribute today to the remarkable resilience of the Garifuna people, a community that has survived wars, exile and deprivation – and which today is flourishing.

“I believe this is due in great part to their absolute refusal to surrender against incredible odds,” says Camillo Gonsalves, permanent representative to the United Nations for St.  Vincent and the Grenadines, who spoke earlier this afternoon at the 39th annual gathering of the festival.

St. Vincent is the ancestral homeland of the Garifuna people, who today are found largely in Belize, Nicaragua, Honduras and Guatemala. A large Garifuna diaspora also exists in New York and New Jersey, the ambassador says.

Among the performers on the Skylands Stage was GAMAE Garifuna, a Brooklyn-based group that bussed some 25 members to New Brunswick to share their lively, percussion-based art.

“Audience! We want you up here dancing!” The words come from Eleanor Castillo, a founder of the troupe who exhorted Rutgers Day visitors to leave their lawn chairs and blankets to move to the lively and persistent beat.

By noon, more than 25,000 people had gathered to share the music experience, according to festival coordinator Angus Gillespie, who anticipates that critical mass would rise as the afternoon winds on.

There’s still plenty of time to take in the sounds of the music and the smells of food grilling. Among the offerings this afternoon are an exploration of the folk roots of New Jersey favorite son Bruce Springsteen, and a celebration of Irish sea songs and pirate ballads.

Posted by: stetler735 | April 27, 2013

Robots Rule at Engineering Open House

No obstacle is too big or small for Navi, a student-designed robot that can find its way around without anyone telling it what to do.

Rutgers student Dave Patrzeba shows of Navi, a robot.

Rutgers student Dave Patrzeba shows of Navi, a robot.

“It knows where it is and it knows what to do without any human interaction,” said Dave Patrzeba, an undergraduate student in the School of Engineering, who helped build Navi.

The robot is  one of many science-related doings at the Busch Campus today, home of the Rutger’s Day Engineering Open House.

Whenever Navi, a robotic intelligent ground vehicle,  is dispatched somewhere, it’s programmed via computer and retains the information.

“It’s continually building a map,” said Patrzeba.

The robot is equipped with a GPS, which keeps it from getting lost. But it also has laser range finders that reflect off objects in its path and help it steer clear, said Patrzeba.

Navi  – its full name is Rutgers Navigator  – took eight undergraduates about 4,000 man hours to build over a span of  three years, said Patrzeba. That included a previous version with glitches that enabled students to avoid past mistakes and build a better robot.

“It’s a perpetual project,” said Patrzeba, adding that a third version will be built in the fall.

Navi’s construction involved students from three disciplines: Mechanical Engineering, Electrical & Computer Engineering and Computer Science.

Andrew Adams, 17, who is visiting from Marlton, was impressed. “That is so cool,” he marveled. “And I think it’s cool that undergrads built it.”

In eighth grade, Adams helped build a robot, so he knows how much work and problem solving is involved.

“I can appreciate the effort,” he said.

Posted by: rlally2013 | April 27, 2013

Rutgers Spirit is Alive and Well

Rutgers pride is shown by almost 3,000 homemade cupcakes.

Rutgers pride is shown by almost 3,000 homemade cupcakes.

Those walking through the Voorhees Mall today are surrounded by a sea of Rs – adorned with flowers and glitter, ribbons and bows – letting those visiting the university know that Rutgers has a proud strong history.

“Everyone really seems to enjoy this area,” says Diana Uveges, business manager in the Recreation Department whose area built the Rocking in the Boat R that plays music and allows children to catch fish for prizes.

The garden area is filled with Rs of all different sizes and decorations created by various units and departments at Rutgers.  Sports, student life, graduation, libraries, and graduate studies are just some of the areas that are taking part in the R-Garden and offering Rutgers Day goers the opportunity to share in Rutgers pride.

And if you’re hungry, the Rutgers Bake Shop has baked 8,000 delicious red and white cupcakes to share with those who come to Rutgers Day. Rutgers bakers have been busy all week, says Jackie Williams who works in the bakeshop and spent about an hour early this morning arranging about 2,800 of the cupcakes in the R-Garden to help welcome those who stop by.  The other 5,000 yummy cupcakes are being offered to those who visit the Busch campus and other Rutgers Day attractions.

Older Posts »

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.