This post was compiled by Robin Lally, Senior Public Relations Specialist

Sunny skies and seasonal temperatures brought a record crowd of 84,000 to the sixth annual Rutgers Day where visitors learned what the state university – with its expanded mission of medical education and transition into the prestigious Big Ten Conference – has to offer.

photo

Klass Klowne performs circus arts during Rutgers Day 2014.

The popular spring event kicked off in the morning on College Avenue with brightly decorated floats and members of the Rutgers Marching Band, the ROTC Color Guard, dance team, cheerleaders and costumed figures from Rutgers’ history making their way from Brower Commons to the Voorhees Mall. Three sharp staccato blasts of a whistle and they were off, pompoms waving, tubas glinting in the crisp, clear light.

“I’m very proud to wear this uniform, and show people what we do,” said Ryan McCarver a sophomore from Glassboro and a representative of Rutgers Air Force ROTC, carrying a red and white welcoming banner.

With nearly 500 programs, the university’s annual welcome and show-and-tell for New Jersey residents of all ages had something to please every member of the family. This year, those who attended the daylong event were able to navigate and plan where to find parking, exhibits, performances and food with a new Rutgers Day mobile app that allowed them to see every program relative to where they were on campus.

By early afternoon, the “Big Time Academics, Big Ten Athletics” white tent was a hub of activity on the Voorhees Mall as students, alums and their families came to learn what Rutgers’ July 1 debut in the Big Ten conference means to the university at which football began 145 years ago.

“I can see Rutgers getting much more recognition nationwide,” said Rutgers senior David Sisto, of Clinton, a finance major.

This was the first Rutgers Day since the creation of Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences (RBHS) last July. For the medical and health science buffs spending the day at the university, neurosurgeons from Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School offered Brain Surgery for/on Dummies.Using highly sophisticated computer simulators visitors to the College Avenue campus were able to see just how brain and spine surgery are done.

On the Busch Campus visitors were able to take a closer look at the mysteries of the brain with a team from the Neurological Institute of New Jersey at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School who asked participants to perform surgery by playing a game and not harming the patient.

“Getting out into the community to give patients more insight into what we do is invaluable,” said Barry Levin, professor and interim chair of the school’s Department of Neurology and Neurosciences.

Meanwhile at Rutgers School of Engineering – where the Federal Aviation Administration has authorized engineers to test unmanned drones –  those who stopped by were able to see a reconnaissance and photography drone on display at the Busch Campus and use a flight simulator to try and keep a plane from crashing.

Rutgers Day also celebrated the New Jersey Folk Festival which marked its 40th anniversary.  Students from East Asian, Spanish, African, Middle East and French special-interest houses in the Global Village Learning Community on the Douglass Campus shared their language and cultural experiences. And as part of the anniversary celebration, Bulgaa Altangerel, the Mongolian ambassador to the United States, attended as a special guest.

Joanna Regulska, vice president for international and global affairs at Rutgers, said she hopes the ambassador’s visit will provide an opportunity to build a stronger relationship with the country. She was one of several dignitaries from Rutgers who met with Altangerel during his visit.

Meanwhile, Marissa Letinski, president of the Rutgers Undergraduate Food Science Club, spent the day at the Food Science building on the Cook/Douglass campus explaining the connection between food and science to those who dropped by for the homemade Tahitian Vanilla, Blueberries and Cream and Cappuccino Ice Cream.

“Everything you eat from the supermarket, a food scientist has developed, reformulated and made healthy.” Letinksi told the crowd.

The day ended with more than 11,500 fans at High Point Solutions Stadium for the Scarlet and White spring football game where Special Olympics New Jersey sent two teams of Olympians to play the final five minutes with a game of flag football. The Big Ten Network handed out free T-shirts following the game and fans had the opportunity to get autographs from their favorite Scarlet Knights and receive the 2014 Rutgers football team poster.

Posted by: Andrea Alexander | April 26, 2014

Welcoming the Mongolian Ambassador

Bulgaa Altangerel, Mongolian Ambassador to the United States

The Mongolian Ambassador to the United States, Bulgaa Altangerel, said he was honored by the warm welcome he received during the 40th anniversary of the New Jersey Folk Festival.

The festival celebrated Mongolian culture with a display of yurts – or tents – which represent the country’s traditional architecture. The ambassador was recognized as the honorary grand marshal of the folk festival, one of the many events at Rutgers Day.

Joanna Regulska, vice president for international and global affairs at Rutgers, said she hopes the ambassador’s visit will provide an opportunity to build a stronger relationship with the country. She was one of several dignitaries from Rutgers who met with Altangerel during his visit.

The ambassador also spoke with Olaf Jensen, an assistant professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Science, whose research focuses on climate change in Mongolia.

“The air temperature in Mongolia over the last 40 years has risen at three times the global average,’’ Jensen said. “If you want to understand what climate change is likely to do here, we can go over there and see what is happening already.’’

Jensen said he also believed the ambassador’s visit would provide an opportunity to strengthen ties.

“Hopefully it will give me a chance to develop better collaborations with Mongolian universities at the official level,’’ Jensen said. “It always helps to have stronger official ties.’’

Posted by: robertforman2014 | April 26, 2014

Cupcake Heaven on the Busch Campus

Image

You can take a cupcake expertly iced by Rutgers Dining Services …

You can’t keep people away from this table at Rutgers Day! Rows and rows of delicious cupcakes attract visitors enjoying the day on the Busch Campus.

Do you like your cupcakes ready made? Staffers from Rutgers Dining Services have shown magnificent technique squeezing dollops of colorful icing onto cupcakes by the dozen.

... or custom decorate your own!

… or custom decorate your own!

Do you have a touch of the artist in you? Then go for a masterpiece.  Bring strong hands to squeeze out your own icing, and then put on some additional toppings. Eating should always be this much fun.

Posted by: robertforman2014 | April 26, 2014

CSI: Rutgers

A young visitor gets a taste of police work

A young visitor gets a taste of police work.

Book ‘em, Dan-O!

If you ever wondered what fingerprinting is all about, come on over to the Busch Campus. First you put your hand on one of the panels on this board (don’t worry, your prints will be wiped clean and NOT kept! Sorry, NSA.), and then Rutgers’ Program in Criminal Justice will show you how to apply a special white powder so you can positively identify yourself!

How does it work? Your skin contains natural oils, which are transferred to surfaces you touch. The powder you gently brush over the “crime scene” sticks to the oil, and the pattern of your prints shows up for you and Law Enforcement to see.

People doing it were having a blast when your faithful Rutgers Day blogger was there. Abigall Sciutto* has nothing on these Rutgers sleuths!

*Forensic whiz on NCIS

 

Posted by: Fredda Sacharow | April 26, 2014

Celebrating Rutgers’ Entrance into the Big Ten

SONY DSC“Big Time Academics, Big Ten Athletics” heralds the banner holding pride of place on the Voorhees Mall.

By early afternoon, the big white tent was a hub of activity as students, alums and their families came to learn what Rutgers’ July 1 debut in the Big Ten conference means to the university at which football made its own debut 145 years ago.
Count Rutgers senior David Sisto of Clinton among the most excited.

“I can see Rutgers getting much more recognition nationwide,” says Sisto, a finance major, adding that his university’s admission into the conference gives him enormous satisfaction and the desire to take in as many upcoming games as possible.

Visitors to the tent are competing in a quiz/scavenger hunt based on Big Ten trivia: How many schools will be in the Big Ten on July 1, 2014? Which is the oldest school in the conference? Which three Big Ten schools use scarlet as an official team color? (We’re not going to give away any answers here, but we’ll be mighty disappointed if anyone misses the “scarlet” question!)

Winners walk away with Rutgers gear … and infinite bragging rights.

Islay Leefe-Griffiths, a native of Manchester, England, who’s spending the semester at Rutgers as a political science student, managed to nail all the answers on the quiz. Surprising? Maybe, but like her fellow UK citizens, she did it with a little help from her (Rutgers) friends.

Posted by: robertforman2014 | April 26, 2014

Are you fit and flexible? Find out on the Busch Campus

Image  It’s a good thing to be physically fit, and today there are people on the Busch Campus who can help.  They’re students working toward their Doctor of Physical Therapy degrees at Rutgers School of Health Related Professions. 

How many situps can you do, and how good is your technique?  How well can you stretch those hamstrings?  Find out as these people did. 

And if you need some help improving your fitness (and most of us do), they also have a wealth of information to take home and use. They and their professors can also answer your questions, both about your own physical fitness and about how you, too, could study physical therapy at Rutgers.

Posted by: Fredda Sacharow | April 26, 2014

Who Doesn’t Love a Parade at Rutgers Day?

SONY DSCThree sharp staccato blasts of a whistle and they were off, pompoms waving, tubas glinting in the crisp, clear light.

For many visitors – certainly the ones lined up five deep in front of the Rutgers Student Center on College Avenue this morning — the annual parade is one of the highlights of Rutgers Day. It’s grown over the years, and this year included Rutgers famed Marching Band, some 200 musicians strong; cheerleaders; dance team members, costumed figures from Rutgers’ history; and floats.

At the very head marched representatives of Rutgers Air Force ROTC, carrying a red and white banner welcoming visitors. “It feels special to be able to lead such a big event,” says Ryan McCarver, a sophomore from Glassboro who held the banner in his gloved hands. “I’m very proud to wear this uniform, and show people what we do.”

It was a festive crowd that greeted McCarver and his fellow marchers on their way from the Student Center to Voorhees Mall. At tables in front of Au Bon Pain, on the steps of fraternity houses along College Avenue, they snapped selfies with the band as backdrop and danced to the beat of such familiar fight songs as “The Bells Must Ring” and “Colonel Rutgers .”

Among the most avid bystanders was Michele Ostrowski of Old Bridge, a graduate who had her two children in tow. “I bring them here because I want them to see what Rutgers looks like,” the former communications major said of the 7-year-old and 10-year-old by her side – all decked out in Rutgers red, of course.

Posted by: Andrea Alexander | April 26, 2014

The Science Behind Ice Cream

Kieran Rogers, almost three, enjoying the Food Science Club's Ice Cream Sale.

Kieran Rogers, almost three, enjoying the Food Science Club’s Ice Cream Sale.

What does science have to do with making ice cream?

Everything.

There is actually science behind all the food we eat, said Marissa Letinski, president of the Rutgers Undergraduate Food Science Club.

Letinski will be spending Rutgers Day explaining the connection between food and science to anyone who drops by for the homemade ice cream sale on Cook Campus. Hurry up before the Tahitian Vanilla, Blueberries and Cream or Cappuccino Ice Cream sells out.

Food scientists are not chefs, she said, but they are the people responsible for making sure everything we eat is safe.

The food science club has been serving ice cream during festivities on the last weekend in April for decades. It’s a tradition that started as a reminder of the days when fresh milk and ice cream were sold at Dudley Farm, Letinski said.

The day is also a chance for the food science club to share information about their chosen career path.

“We touch everyone’s lives with food science, but no one knows what food science is,’’ Letinski said.

“Everything you eat from the supermarket, a food scientist has developed, reformulated and made healthy,’’ Letinksi said. “Even the produce – a food scientist has figured out a way to get it to the supermarket at its freshest.’’

Posted by: robertforman2014 | April 26, 2014

Busch Campus — The Wonder of Flight, With or Without Pilots

 

Flight simulator in action!

Flight simulator in action!

Without engineers to build them right, machines wouldn’t work, bridges would collapse and planes would never fly. At Rutgers School of Engineering, students are learning to do it right! In fact, Rutgers is one of just a handful of universities across the country that the Federal Aviation Administration has authorized to test the next big (or very tiny!) thing in aviation — unmanned drones. There is a reconnaissance and photography drone on display on the Busch Campus from now ’til 4:00. Come touch it, look at the electronics inside, and ask lots of questions. Engineering students here know the answers. Also, use the flight simulator at the same exhibit as James Richard Durko of Edison is doing here, and try to keep your “plane” from crashing! All that, and it’s even next to the barbecue grills where the food will be great and plentiful.

Piscataway-20140426-00035

Rutgers drone ready for flight

 

Posted by: Melissa Kvidahl | April 24, 2014

Rutgers Day in Six Easy Steps

This is a guest post written by our Rutgers Day intern, Nancy Yang.

To celebrate our sixth annual Rutgers Day, here is an essential six-step guide to help you have the best experience.

Step One: Get connected.

Subscribe to all things Rutgers Day by liking our Facebook page and following @RutgersDay on Twitter. Receive exclusive updates and ask any questions you may have about the event. Brand new to Rutgers Day this year, our mobile app is ready for download on iPhone and Android. This intuitive application features interactive maps that allow you to create your own itinerary for Rutgers Day.

Step Two: Choose a campus.

Rutgers Day expands across three New Brunswick campuses: Busch , Cook/Douglass , and College Avenue. Our recommendation is to pick one campus to explore and check out another campus at the next Rutgers Day. Discover the unique program offerings of each campus through our website or through our new mobile app.

Step Three: Get there and get around.Students and visitors walking about on campus for Rutgers Day.

If you’re arriving by car, feel free to park in any of the Rutgers lots, which are free all day. Keep in mind that Hamilton Street on the College Avenue Campus will be closed, as will Lipman Drive and College Farm Road on Cook. The Northeast Corridor line also leads you right to the fun on College Avenue if you are using NJ Transit. When you get here, navigate the day like a Rutgers student by using our special shuttle traveling all around the campuses.

Step Four: Explore, explore, explore!

There are tons of new programs that are going to be held at Rutgers Day 2014. You can’t miss the Big Ten tent or the annual parade at 11 a.m., both on College Avenue. On Busch, stop by the many new programs by Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences and cheer on the Scarlet Knights at the Scarlet-White game at 4 p.m. at the stadium. If you love adorable animals, head to Cook/Douglass to get your fix.

Step Five: Fuel up.

With a variety of tasty food options, Rutgers Day will fulfill any craving. Check out Rutgers’ very own food truck, the Knight Wagon, for a delicious, on-the-go meal. There will also be food vendors offering everything from traditional carnival food favorites to café style coffee.

Step Six: Share your day with us.

Don’t forget to post your pictures to Facebook and Twitter with #rutgersday.

Older Posts »

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.